Overview

*Applications will be reviewed on a rolling-basis.

CDC Office and Location: A research opportunity is currently available with the Child Development and Disability Branch (CDDB) of the Division of Human Development and Disability (DHDD), National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia.

The National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD) seeks to promote the health of babies, children, and adults with disabilities. The work of NCBDDD includes identifying the causes of birth defects and developmental disabilities, helping children to develop and reach their full potential, and promoting health and well-being among people of all ages with disabilities. NCBDDD has three Divisions that carry out this mission: Division of Congenital and Developmental Disorders (DCDD), Human Development and Disability (DHDD), and Blood Disorders (DBD).

Research Project: Specifically, this opportunity is currently available within DHDD’s Child Development and Disability Branch (CDDB). DHDD leads inclusive programs to optimize the health and development of children and adults with or at risk for disabilities. The Child Development and Disability Branch (CDDB) leads inclusive programs, surveillance, and research to optimize the health and development of children with, or at risk for, developmental delays, disorders, or disabilities which affect 1 in 6 U.S. children. The Surveillance Team collaborates with external partners in multiple communities across the U.S. to monitor the prevalence and early identification of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) among children through CDC’s Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network. The team also operates an ADDM site in metropolitan Atlanta. In addition to producing the go-to estimate for ASD prevalence in U.S. communities, the ADDM Network produces key data on other developmental disabilities, co-occurring conditions, and disparities in community practices. To improve early identification of developmental disabilities and better understand service needs, the team also analyzes vital records, surveys, and other administrative data, and collaborates with the Learn the Signs. Act Early program.

Learning Objectives: Under the guidance of mentors from the Surveillance Team, the participant will train on the following projects and activities:

– Draw upon public health training and experience and contribute to various elements of the DHDD/CDDB activities, such as public health surveillance, scientific translation, programmatic objectives, and writing by supporting activities of the Autism Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network and the Metropolitan Atlanta Developmental Disabilities Surveillance Program (MADDSP).
– Acquire scientific knowledge in the field of autism spectrum disorder and other developmental disabilities.
– Receive mentored guidance in the day-to-day activities necessary for a multiple-state surveillance network.
– Enhance communications skills through engagement with site partners, and participation in project working groups.
– Improve surveillance translation skills by compiling data feedback reports for MADDSP partners and assisting with the development of communication materials for ADDM.
– Acquire knowledge and assist in program directives, issuances, memorandum, and policy statements for the program.
– Increase program implementation skills through assistance with program monitoring and evaluation of the public health program.
– Learn and exercise responsibilities necessary for the initiation, administration, of grants and cooperative agreements, and the technical assistance needed.
– Assist in the administration of the annual budget and/or requests for funding based on information received from subordinate activities.

Mentor(s): The mentor for this opportunity is Monica DiRienzo (vnz3@cdc.gov). If you have questions about the nature of the research please contact the mentor.

Anticipated Appointment Start Date: February 1, 2023.  Start date is flexible and will depend on a variety of factors.

Appointment Length: The appointment will initially be for one year, but may be renewed up to a total of five years upon recommendation of CDC and is contingent on the availability of funds.

Level of Participation: The appointment is part-time (15 hours per week).

Participant Stipend: The participant will receive a monthly stipend commensurate with educational level and experience.

Citizenship Requirements: This opportunity is available to U.S. citizens, Lawful Permanent Residents (LPR), and foreign nationals. Non-U.S. citizen applicants should refer to the Guidelines for Non-U.S. Citizens Details page of the program website for information about the valid immigration statuses that are acceptable for program participation.

ORISE Information: This program, administered by ORAU through its contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to manage the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was established through an interagency agreement between DOE and CDC. Participants do not become employees of CDC, DOE or the program administrator, and there are no employment-related benefits. Proof of health insurance is required for participation in this program. Health insurance can be obtained through ORISE.

The successful applicant(s) will be required to comply with Environmental, Safety and Health (ES&H) requirements of the hosting facility, including but not limited to, COVID-19 requirements (e.g. facial covering, physical distancing, testing, vaccination).

Questions: Please visit our Program Website. After reading, if you have additional questions about the application process please email ORISE.CDC.NCBDDD@orau.org and include the reference code for this opportunity.
Qualifications
The qualified candidate should be currently pursuing a master’s degree in one of the relevant fields.

Preferred skills:

– Public Health background
– Comfortable engaging external partners both national and state
– Strong organization skills
– Ability to work in a team environment and independently
– Ability to respond to requests and inquiries in a timely and efficient manner
– Ability to develop talking points and impact statements that reflect program strategies and priorities
– Interest in developing procurements
– Strong oral and written communication skills